Book choice for October 2019

The Silence of the Girls [suggested by Ross Allatt]

The Silence of the Girls

Here is the story of the Iliad as we've never heard it before: in the words of Briseis, Trojan queen and captive of Achilles. Given only a few words in Homer's epic and largely erased by history, she is nonetheless a pivotal figure in the Trojan War. In these pages she comes fully to life: wry, watchful, forging connections among her fellow female prisoners even as she is caught between Greece's two most powerful warriors. Her story pulls back the veil on the thousands of women who lived behind the scenes of the Greek army camp -- concubines, nurses, prostitutes, the women who lay out the dead -- as gods and mortals spar, and as a legendary war hurtles toward its inevitable conclusion. Brilliantly written, filled with moments of terror and beauty, The Silence of the Girls gives voice to an extraordinary woman -- and makes an ancient story new again. [product description from Amazon]

The book has a Wikipedia entry.

Author's Wikipedia entry.
Author does not have a website, but there are biographical notes on the Penguin website.

 

Shortlisted for this month

For this month, Ross's other selections were:

Song of Solomon

Song of Solomon

In 1930s America Macon learns about the tyranny of white society from his friend Guitar, though he is more concerned with escaping the familial tyranny of his own father. So while Guitar joins a terrorist group Macon goes home to the South, lured by tales of buried family treasure. But his odyssey back home and a deadly confrontation with Guitar leads to the discovery of something infinitely more valuable than gold: his past and the origins of his true self. [product description from Amazon]

The novel has a Wikipedia entry.

Author's Wikipedia entry.
Once again the author has no web page but instead their very own society.

 

Normal People

Normal People

Connell and Marianne grow up in the same small town in rural Ireland. The similarities end there; they are from very different worlds. When they both earn places at Trinity College in Dublin, a connection that has grown between them lasts long into the following years.

This is an exquisite love story about how a person can change another person's life - a simple yet profound realisation that unfolds beautifully over the course of the novel. It tells us how difficult it is to talk about how we feel and it tells us - blazingly - about cycles of domination, legitimacy and privilege. Alternating menace with overwhelming tenderness, Sally Rooney's second novel breathes fiction with new life. [product description from Amazon]

The novel has a Wikipedia page.

Author's Wikipedia entry.
And to complete the hat-trick this author also does not have a website, but there are publisher's notes.

 

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2008

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2007

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2006

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